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Green light for rail scheme means fewer lorries on Essex roads

By Nick Mann

  • Network Rail’s proposal for use of Officers’ Meadow will enable delivery of Crossrail construction materials by rail instead of road

Brentwood Borough Council has approved a Network Rail scheme to build a temporary rail access point at Officers’ Meadow to reduce Crossrail lorry movements in Brentwood and Shenfield.

Following a public information session last autumn, Network Rail submitted a planning application for the scheme in response to concerns raised by residents about the impact of works to prepare the railway for the start of Crossrail services. The scheme will allow the project to reduce lorry movements in Brentwood and Shenfield town centres and help to keep disruption to a minimum.

The approved scheme comprises a temporary access road, around 650m long, to be built from the A1023 (Chelmsford Road) and the construction of a temporary working and storage compound. The lorries will deliver materials and equipment to the compound, from where it will be transferred onto rail vehicles.

The land will be required until early 2018 and the site will be fully restored to its previous condition.

Nigel Fenn, Network Rail’s Project Director said: “As part of our Railway Upgrade Plan we are undertaking major works to prepare the existing railway for the arrival of Crossrail and are committed to minimising the impact of these works on local residents.

“The approval of the Officers’ Meadow Scheme will help us to address the concerns of local people about lorry movements in Brentwood and Shenfield. By using a temporary rail access point at Officers’ Meadow, we’ll be able to supply our worksites with materials by rail instead of by road, reducing the impact on the local community.”

From 2017, a fleet of new, air-conditioned, 200 metre long trains will be introduced by Transport for London between Shenfield and Liverpool Street. 

From 2019, when the Crossrail route opens fully, a train every five minutes at peak times will allow passengers to travel right through the centre of the capital without having to change. People who choose to catch the fast train from Shenfield will also benefit, as Crossrail will help to relieve congestion at Liverpool Street station and on the existing London Underground lines.  

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For further information contact the Crossrail Press Office on 020 3229 9552 or email pressoffice@crossrail.co.uk

About Crossrail and Network Rail:

Network Rail is a key partner in delivering Crossrail. It is responsible for the design, development and delivery of the parts of Crossrail that are on the existing rail network. Network Rail’s work, which will integrate the new Crossrail tunnels beneath London with the existing rail network, includes upgrades to track, major civil engineering projects, new overhead electrification equipment and improvements to stations and bridges.

Three quarters of the Crossrail route will run above ground in outer London, Berkshire and Essex, bringing 1.5 million more people to within 45 minutes of central London.

Crossrail will increase central London's rail transport capacity by 10 per cent, supporting regeneration and cutting journey times by providing new links with the Tube, Thameslink, National Rail, DLR and London Overground.

The total funding available to deliver Crossrail is £14.8bn. The Crossrail route will serve 40 stations and run more than 100km from Reading and Heathrow in the west, through new twin-bore 21 km (13 miles) tunnels below central London to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

Crossrail is being delivered by Crossrail Limited (CRL). CRL is a wholly owned subsidiary of Transport for London. Crossrail is jointly sponsored by the Department for Transport and Transport for London.