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Phased Opening

Phased Opening

The Elizabeth line remains on track to open in the first half of 2022.

The final phase of the programme, Trial Operations, is now underway and is the final step before passenger services can commence. Trial Operations involves operational exercises to ensure the safety and reliability of the railway for public use and to fully test the timetables.

It will take several months to complete Trial Operations. With new stations, infrastructure, tracks and trains, the Elizabeth line will be opened in phases to ensure the railway is reliable for customers.

Opening any railway is a massive job. With new stations, new infrastructure, new track and new trains, it is important that the Elizabeth line is opened in phases to ensure it is safe, reliable, performs as expected and is maintainable.

The Elizabeth line is a complex railway that will operate across the Great Western mainline, one of Britain's oldest and busiest railways, a newly built railway under central London, and the Great Eastern mainline, built in Victorian times. Spanning old and new means the Elizabeth line trains must operate on a purpose-built railway serving only the Elizabeth line, and on the existing national rail tracks shared with other operators and freight. To add extra complexity, Elizabeth line trains will need to effortlessly transition between three signalling systems across the line. It’s vital therefore that we build reliability in the trains and systems over many hours to ensure they are ready to safely carry the estimated 200 million passengers that will use the Elizabeth line when fully open.

Each element of the Elizabeth line goes through a rigorous testing and commissioning process. Learn more about how we handover and assure the railway here


REMAINING OPENING STAGES

2021 - Timetable changes

Between May 2021 and May 2022 a number of planned changes to timetabled services will be carried out, which will better align the railway on the east and west with their future final frequencies and create space for Elizabeth line services which will eventually operate through the new central section from Shenfield, Heathrow and Reading.

2022 - Launch of the Elizabeth line

In the first half of 2022, the Elizabeth line will launch with a new passenger between ten new London stations from Paddington to Abbey Wood, with the new Class 345 trains through new tunnels under central London. The launch will bring immediate benefits to passengers travelling between these stations with 12 trains per hour, in each direction, all day until the next phase of opening. Services from Reading and Heathrow to Paddington mainline, and from Shenfield to Liverpool Street mainline will be rebranded from TfL Rail to the Elizabeth line. Until the next phase of opening the Elizabeth line will operate as three separate railways. The services on the east and west will continue to run into the mainline stations and passengers wishing to continue their journey to one of the new Elizabeth line central London stations will need to change to Paddington or Liverpool Street Elizabeth line station.

2022 - Integration of Elizabeth line services from the east and west

Later in 2022, currently expected to be the autumn, the next phase of opening the Elizabeth line will integrate services from the east and west into the new central tunnels and stations bringing additional benefits to those travelling to and from the east and west. This connection brings the three railways together and enables services from Reading and Heathrow through to Abbey Wood and from Shenfield through to Paddington. The service in the central stations between Paddington and Whitechapel will be 24 trains per hour during the peak.

2023 - Final version of the timetable

The final timetable across the entire railway will be in place no later than May 2023. The service in the central section between Paddington and Whitechapel will remain at 24 trains per hour during the peak.


COMPLETED STAGES

2015 - TfL Rail between Liverpool Street mainline and Shenfield

The first phase, completed in 2015, was the start of operations on the Liverpool Street mainline to Shenfield route, directly replacing the Greater Anglia ‘Metro’ services, using the same trains. The service was branded ‘TfL Rail’. This is a temporary brand in operation until the Elizabeth line launches, after which TfL Rail will become part of the Elizabeth line. Changing to a TfL run service provided several benefits to passengers, from deep cleaning of stations, better accessibility through station staffing offering customers who need assistance a turn-up-and-go service, to cheaper fares.

2017 - The start of operation with new Class 345 trains in the east

2017 saw the introduction of the new Class 345 trains, purpose-built for the Elizabeth line on the Liverpool Street mainline to Shenfield route, replacing the older trains used by TfL Rail since 2015. At launch, these new Class 345 trains were seven carriages long, instead of the full nine carriages to fit into Liverpool Street mainline station which required platform lengthening. The trains provided several immediate benefits to passengers including air conditioning, dedicated wheelchair spaces, CCTV and on-train service information. A number of infrastructure improvements were carried out to enable these trains to run on this section, including the construction of sidings at Ilford Depot and Gidea Park.

2018 - TfL Rail between Heathrow and Paddington mainline

The next phase, completed in 2018, was the start of operations on the Heathrow Airport to Paddington mainline route, directly replacing the Heathrow Connect service, and using the same trains. Like the east, the service was also branded ‘TfL Rail’ and stations received several improvements benefitting passengers, from ticket barriers and better lighting, to improved signage and ticket machines.

2019 - TfL Rail between Reading and Paddington mainline

The start of operations from Reading to Paddington mainline from December 2019 marked the next phase. This was directly replacing several Great Western Railway stopping services into Paddington. Network Rail extended platforms to cater for the new trains, install new walkways and lifts to improve step-free accessibility, and improve passenger flow within stations. Old Oak Common depot was commissioned in 2018 to house and maintain the new trains and will be the main depot for the Elizabeth line train. Services between Reading and Paddington were introduced using seven carriage Class 345 trains.

2020 - The start of full-length new Class 345 trains from Reading

The next phase, completed in early 2020, was the start of the full nine carriage Class 345 trains on the Reading to Paddington mainline route.

2020 - The start of new Class 345 train operations from Heathrow

A major milestone was completed in July 2020, with the replacement of the older trains on the Heathrow to Paddington mainline route, previously operated by Heathrow Connect, with the new nine carriage Class 345 trains. Customers travelling to the airport benefitted from longer trains with walkthrough carriages.

2021 - Platform extensions at Liverpool Street mainline

The platforms at Liverpool Street mainline were extended at Easter 2021 to be able to accommodate the full nine-carriage Class 345 trains on the Liverpool Street mainline to Shenfield route. Trains on this route will be extended to their nine-carriage full length throughout 2021 and into 2022. 

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